NRA Tips & Tactics- Natural Point Of Aim

Finding your natural point of aim (NPA) is one of the most important aspects of downrange accuracy. The goal of NPA is to eliminate muscular tension that can affect your downrange accuacy. In this episode of Tips & Tactics, sponsored by Cabela's Outdoor Fund, Kristy Titus explains the process of testing your natural point of aim with a rifle, and Gabby Franco follows up to explain that the same can be done when shooting a pistol.


Tech Tuesday- Rifle Gear Disaster Prevention

The animal of your dreams is in your crosshairs, one press of the trigger and all of your dreams will come true. That holds true given that all of your equipment is functioning properly together. Before heading out into the field this rifle season, here are a few simple items to double check on your weapon system and to bring afield to ensure downrange accuracy and consistency.

Here are a few items to double check before your next rifle hunt:

Double checking that your rifle does not have any loose fasteners or cracks in the construction of the stock. It is especially important to torque your action screws.

Use a dollar bill to ensure that your barrel is free floated.

Make sure that your rifle sling stud is properly attached to the stock. The last thing you want is to drop your rifle causing damage due to a faulty sling stud.

In the field or on hand nearby be sure to bring along for field expedient repairs:

A supportive gun case is a must for transit of your rifle. This holds especially true when transporting your rifle to and from hunting areas on bumpy roads where your rifle scope zero is easily knocked off. Check out some great options from Cabela's here...

The Borka Tool Expanded Field Kit contains everything you need afield. The torque wrench can be custom calibrated for your action or scope rings/bases.

Wheeler also makes a Torque Fat Wrench to achieve and manintain factory torque settings.

And don’t forget to ring along your manufacture recommendations for torque specs on action screws, scope rings and bases.

Wheeler Pro Reticle Scope Level System- will ensure that if you need to mount an optic afield, it is installed correctly.  

Compact cleaning rod and cotton patches to remove moisture from rifle barrel. Check out the Herter's All-In-One Kit that covers most rifles, pistols and shotguns. 

JB weld is great to bring along in the event that your rifle sling stud comes loose.

 

 

Tech Tuesday- Magpul Hunter 700 Stock

Fit is key to downrange accuracy on all firearms. This past week in the NRA Women’s Network, Tips & Tactics, I discussed some considerations to make when evaluating rifle fit. One of the barreled actions that I used in the tips was set into a Magpul Hunter 700 stock.

I am a big fan of the Hunter 700 stock for many reasons- first, the length of pull (LOP) is easily adjustable from 13.0-15.0” with .5” spacers accommodating nearly any sized shooter. My LOP is actually 12.5” but the 13” adjusted LOP is still short enough to allow me to consistently mount the rifle for increased downrange accuracy.

The cheek comb height is adjustable as well allowing the shooters eye to be properly aligned with the mounted optic. The stock comes pre-fitted with a .25” riser and includes the option of a .50” and .75” to adjust weld locations for a multitude of shooters.

The stock is a true drop in fit for standard Remington 700 short actions with stock Remington hinged floor plates. It is light weight at 2.9 pounds making it a great fit for your mountain rifle.

And last, the price is what sets the Hunter 700 stock apart from the rest with a retail price of $259.99 available at Cabela’s in black and flat dark earth colors. 

Cabela's Industry Insider- Shoot Like A Girl at NRA

Shoot Like A Girl (SLG², Inc) is a company dedicated to growing the number of women who participate in shooting sports by empowering them to particpate with confidence! Look for Shoot Like A Girl at six Cabela's Grand Opening Celebrations in 2015 and RMEF's Hunter Christmas.


North American Hunter- Old Guns Never Die

The old rifle sat in the corner of my dad’s shop for as long as I can remember. The barrel reads: “Old Reliable,” Sharps Rifle Co., Bridgeport Conn.

The round barrel had been cut down to a fraction of its once 30-inch length, but it remained on the original Model 1878 hammerless .45-70 Govt. sporter action that rested on a beat-up replacement of the original stock. We’d never fired the rifle because it was extremely old and appeared fragile.

The gun was something that my father and I had taken little interest in—until this year when I made the decision to invest in “Old Reliable” and have the once state-of-the-art sporting rifle restored to her original glory by Doug Turnbull of Turnbull Restoration and Manufacturing Co.

Continue Reading...

 

North American Hunter- Bullet Selection for Big Game

The most important aspect to hunting success is the person behind the gun selecting a suitable bullet type and weight that affords maximum terminal performance for the intended game animal. Hunting bullets are designed to terminally perform in different ways for specific hunting purposes which varies from varmints to big game. The bullet we pick will change depending on the quarry we're hunting.

Click HERE to read the editorial in North American Hunter online. 

North American Hunter- Fall 2014

 

The North American Hunter Magazine is circulated to nearly 1 million households around the world taking pride in being in the know in regards to all things hunting. Everything from finding that big buck in your woods or planning the next big hunting adventure.

Fall 2014- 

Making It Count

Build the strength now to stabilize your shot of a lifetime.

You've spent the time researching the best areas and scouting, and you have invested in the best gear. It's time to make an investment in your fitness so that you have the strength to stabilize your shot of a lifetime. 

Click here to learn more about North American Hunter Magazine or to subscribe. 

 

North American Hunter- Frame Your Sight Picture

Managing your sight picture for terminal downrange performance is not a tool you can buy.

Terminally connecting on that trophy of a lifetime with a single, well-placed bullet or arrow is critical on every hunt. Learning to manage your sight picture with your bow and rifle will help you to become a more accurate marksman, and ensure that the bullet or arrow is delivered where it needs to go for quick and terminal placement on big game animals.

CLICK HERE to read Kristy's latest article in North American Hunter online. 

 

 

North American Hunter- Prone Bipod for Hunting Rifles

I feel so blessed to be able to share some of the techniques that I have learned while training with Magpul Dynamics. Here is my latest editorial. I hope this brings you all success this hunting season. 

Having a prone-length bipod mounted on my hunting rifle has been one of the best investments I’ve ever made, helping to stabilize my shots while in the field from not only the prone position, but kneeling, sitting and standing, too. A gun-mounted bipod creates a more stable shooting platform for a quick and accurate in-the-field shot than is possible with a backpack, log, fencepost or rock.

CLICK HERE TO READ ENTIRE ARTICLE


North American Hunter- How Well Does Your Rifle Fit You?

In the field, one does not rise up to the occasion but instead falls back on training. You’ve put in countless hours scouting, training in the gym and dreaming of this moment. You’re ready. But will you have the same level of confidence and competence this hunting season with your hunting rifle?

Let’s face it, when in the field, Mother Nature is anything but predictable. As a hunter, it’s our ethical responsibility to understand our own individual gun or bow system, learn how it works and what we can do to improve upon it, and know its limitations as well as our own. No matter how long we’ve been hunting or shooting, there are new skills and tricks that can be learned and applied.

In my latest editorial for North American Hunter online, I go over a few tips to modify your rifle to fit more properly before your next hunt.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE EDITORIAL